It has to be fun or don’t do it, confessions of a Roller Derby promoter


Jerry Seltzer:

coming off the Brown Paper Ticket booth and all at Rollercon, and our marketing seminar, I thought it would be fun to send this out again (after 4 years) on why I did what I did.

Originally posted on RollerDerbyJesus.com:

When my older son was just seven or eight we took  him and a friend to the opening of the Bay Bombers outdoor season at the San Jose Ball Park.   We always had a picnic with the skaters and fans on the outfield grass before the first game.  It is a beautiful little park holding about 3000 and the fans loved to come there.  It was almost always sold out in advance.

After we picnicked on the grass I walked with the children to their seats.  Steven’s friend turned to him and said I thought you said we were going to your father’s work — this is just a good time.

I always thoroughly enjoyed Roller Derby;  not only the game and the skaters and the fans, but the fact it was something I really loved doing.  And because we were outside of the usual sports spectrum we could…

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Celebrate the history of Roller Derby


Jerry Seltzer:

coming up in just a few weeks, the 79th anniversary of the Game…..where did it start?

Originally posted on RollerDerbyJesus.com:

This is the historic Chicago Coliseum.

It was built in the late 1800s, constructed largely of the bricks from the terrible civil war Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia, and was located at 1513 S. Wabash St.

For a long time it was the main exposition and gathering place for Chicagoans:  The 1896 Democratic convention was held here, and events from sporting goods shows to basketball and horse shows utilized the building.

And on August 13, 1935, Leo Seltzer put about 20 men and women on roller skates in order to skate a marathon the distance of the US from coast to coast for a prize money of $500

A team was one man and a woman, and they would alternate, and rest on view in the infield in between skating times.  The event started each day in the morning and lasted until about midnight.  The admission was 10 cents, and…

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