after 2012, what?


OK, so “Derby Baby” is out soon, there is talk about considering Derby for the Olympics (I wouldn’t be too excited…..it would be a long ways off), and from what I have seen, this looks like a great start to the year.

I know some of the great players retire every year, but a greater number are showing up, and  a star from Colorado did so at the Doll House last night.

Those of you with four or five years experience really know the game now, and are aware of the need for conditioning, diet, practice, and a great lifestyle.

And I often hear from those of you who say things are just fine as they are now; you want the rules to remain the same, to have the costumes and fun and after parties.  And nothing is stopping you.

And please all realize that.  There is no need for a great unification of style of play….no need for ownership.  If you want to flat track, go backwards, renegade, MADE, OSDA – that is your prerogative.   And one of the first things I heard after it was released that Roller Derby was being considered in 2013 for the 2020 Olympics was “we don’t like the rule set they will be playing”.

Will you still be playing in 2020?  And if you think there is a possibility of getting in before 2024, you are dreaming.   And you think all current rules will remain constant for 12 years?  Relax and enjoy the games……and you are not the ones that this post is addressing.

For those of you who are serious athletes and competitiors, I offer the following:

1.  It is time to associate with a league that is going to skate on a banked track, and I would love to see that happen in New York, Philly, Atlanta, Detroit, Chicago, Kansas City, Dallas, Denver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco………it will allow the teams and skaters to progress at a accelerated rate……all who want to skate flat track should continue…..it is a different game.

2.  Get serious about what you wear at your games.  Uniforms that are really professional, with numbers on back (not #1), your real name on the back and a dynamite design.  I strongly suggest Roll Models,  go to http://www.completeteamoutfitters.com, click on Roll models link…..they do a lot of other sports and quite a number of Derby Leagues.

3.  Really get your PR and Marketing going full tilt to attract new skaters, and especially a larger audience so you have the funds to work with.  And most of you need to skate more home matches (more games, more concessions, more merchandise,  more revenue)……

4.  Do not play teams that you can beat up….may be good for rankings, terrible for paying audience….they want to see contests.

Now realize you don’t have to do any of the above.  Obviously this is what I and a few others would like to see.  By the way, I make no money from selling banked tracks or uniforms.  I just want the game and you to be as professional as possible.

Please don’t bitch and moan at me……one-sided games are  fine, not-ready-skate-players are fine, tattered uniforms, fine, bad attendance fine, keeping your league hidden, fine.  1 game a month, fine……I just don’t think it is the way to go.

6 comments on “after 2012, what?

  1. Having a hard time embracing the new movement towards uniformity and athletic conditioning. But with your post, I except just a little more. And I am sure I will slowly come to embrace the change. The punk rock atmosphere and the theatrics are what first attracted me. I guess it’s time to get more fit and throw out the ripped fishnets.

    • I’m incredibly confounded by your comment about atheletic conditioning. This is a sport, of course you have to be atheletically fit to be a part of it. If you’re not willing to put that effort into it, you shouldn’t be a part of it. It’s not fair to your team mates or the game itself. As to keeping the punk rock and theatrical atmosphere, it’s cool if that’s what you want. However if you’re going to go that route you should realized your sport will never be considered a serious sport and no way in the world will it ever make it to the Olympics. Your group would be a laughing stock there.

  2. Why do you equate “serious” with banked track? Do you think it takes more skill to skate banked, or that it would be a bigger draw for TV dollars. With Flat Track you have crossover with Speed Skateing, and some of the BEST derby skaters around now have in the past, or currently speed skate. A Flat track also opens up the sport to a league anywhere without the resources to store or fabricate a banked track. Banked track derby is entertaining, but it is not the future for a growth sport.

    • If you note, I said flat track will continue and is a different game. Ask skaters who have skated banked track (from flat track) and most will tell you that it enhances the game. And if you read it carefully, all leagues will not be able to do this, but teams with the draw (and it should increase with BT) will get more spectators on a consistent basis ( see LA Derby Dolls), and for many leagues and players who don’t even get their expenses, that would be a huge benefit. What I am saying is do what you want, but again, no one style is good for anyone.

      I love flat track and will continue to support it. Some cities have the potential to draw more, and yes, a banked track requires storage, but the cost difference between it and a sportcourt in pretty close.

      • but the cost differ between 3 rolls of tape on a concrete or gym floor vs a banked track is significant. while storage space may be similar, labor for moving a banked track is not comparable to a sport court.

    • Absolutely it takes more skill to skate a banked track game then a flat track. How anyone could possibly think it doesn’t is beyond me. And trust me, other then local and public TV, no one will be interested in putting a flat track game on their network. This is partly a problem the girl’s created for themselves. If a viewer who knew nothing about the two types..flat or banked, saw both, it would look to them like the flat track was amatuer and banked track the pros. Do both, but don’t fool yourself into believing flat track will go beyond where it is right now.

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