Whose game is it anyway?

With this post, total views of my blog will exceed 400,000.  You may want to read some of the 528 previous ones.

Last week the New York Shock Exchange were on CNBC at the closing bell of the New York Stock Exchange (glad they saw the connection and humor in it) and really did a great job explaining modern Derby and the Brown Paper Tickets blood drives (they and the Gotham Girls and Suburbia Roller Derby all participated) to on air people who had no idea that Roller Derby was in existence.

I watched in amazement.  Not only are the Gotham Girls the best women’s team in the world, but there have been so many features on them in all media.  They have been in existence for a dozen years (the Stock Exchange for 10); over 59,000 likes on their Facebook page….and on and on.

So obviously that is one fight for recognition and stature that is still to be fought.

Ironically, with the Olympics in the forefront, can anyone say there is a more pure and honest sport than Roller Derby, requiring so much sacrifice and dedication on behalf of its participants.

So who gets credit for modern Derby and the 1900 women, men and junior leagues that participate in it in 60 countries throughout the world?

Not me nor my father, who saw our game end in 1973.

I am honored by the connection to the original game, but this sport would have never emerged if it hadn’t been for the efforts of not only the women in Austin, but of those throughout the country (and the world) who shaped what has occurred.

So make of this modern version of what you want: a game created by women for women; a sport that men are enjoying, as are the juniors and recreational participants.  It is yours and be proud and work with all others who are skating the game in some form and open it up to the world.

All of us, the old and the new, will be happy.

All good things come to an end…..my last Rollercon coming up

I think I have been to 8, but not certain.

But this one is my last.  Lots of reasons but mostly personal.

I will go out with a bang:  hosting final interactive Brown Paper Tickets seminar Thursday, July 28, 3:15 pm room S456 at the Westgate.

talking about make your events successful and a lot more.  prizes, of course.  hope you all come.

I hope you will come and see me during the week.  I will be either at Brown Paper Tickets in the admission section, or with my buddy Doug at the Roll Models (uniform) booth, or walking around…but only on Thursday will you be able to hear my priceless words of wisdom.

Two of my Derby wives will be on hand:  Val Capone and Donna “Hot Flash”, but will miss Lara Irons, Lori Milkeris, and Carly Marie.  And Barbara Dolan and Bob Noxious aren’t coming either, nor is Szerdi Nagy or Mellfire or too many others, but I know about 5000 of you will be there, so no chance of being lonely.

And I still am with Brown Paper Tickets and always accessible to discuss anything with you……what kind of company hires somebody when they are 80 and only cares that its clients are satisfied?  honestly, nobody like them.

see you round the pool

The Commissioner



Now I am ashamed

I never was really pressed for grades in high school, but kind of pulled it together my last year, and I was genuinely surprised when I was successfully admitted to Stanford.

Stanford academically is one of America’s top universities and also has a beautiful campus, great facilities and top teams in most sports: football, basketball, swimming and more. And I met some of the most important people in my life there.

Later, as I decided I wanted more of a business background, I transferred to Northwestern University where I eventually graduated.

But I have always considered myself a “Stanford man” and followed the teams, the Nobel Prizes, the achievements, etc.

And now a spoiled brat of a kid on the swimming team has made me feel queasy when I think of this school I loved so much.

He raped an unconscious woman behind a dumpster, was apprehended and caught by two passersby (heroes!) who testified against him; was judged guilty, but his father got expensive lawyers who humiliated the woman (read her letter; she is the ultimate hero). But the jurors still found him guilty; the prosecutor asked for the maximum 14 years, but the judge (good old boys working here?), gave him just six months in a really offensive ruling. (The kid’s father’s letter: “should he really get such an extreme punishment for just 20 minutes of action”)

Now a Stanford Law Professor has asked Santa Clara County Superior Court to suspend the judge, and it happens as this is written that the judge is up for re-election (unopposed), and I and 75 thousand have petitioned the county to remove him.

I guess the most unimportant thing here is my discomfort about Stanford’s reputation; I keep thinking of the continuing horror, nightmares, and more this 23-year old woman will experience for the rest of her life. Maybe the lesson is that we should all feel shame for all evil acts, no matter who commits them, and try to make certain that there is justice.

Roller Derby 2016, a look ahead

A facebook friend whom I have known for 6 years had an image come on his page which was from Key Arena in 2009, where the whole lower bowl was filled with 7000 fans for Roller Derby for the Rat City League.

It seems as though that was a high point for fan interest in games for most leagues.  Today many leagues have moved down in the size of the venues (and if they haven’t, they should check their average attendance and realize they are not in operation to pay high costs to venues), and are they really assessing the strength of their attraction to a paid audience.

Let me make a point here that always seem to be contentious to those who developed the modern flat track game.  I take no credit for what you have developed and have spread virtually worldwide.  In the past, I have been the subject of resentment (by a very few) because of my family’s creation of the banked track game.  I am sorry for that, but I think most know that I am only interested in the skaters and the success (however measured) of what they are doing.

I as a promoter and as a spectator really liked the game in 2009…obviously it has changed since then and, except in a few exceptional areas, attendance has declined. That should tell you more about the reality of the situation than anything else.  Once you open the doors and charge admission, you are in competition with all other forms of entertainment (whether you want to call it that or not), and what you present is how the public judges if it is worthwhile to spend their time and money there.

So there’s the rub; most of those who have entered the world of skating do so because it fills a special need in their lives and they enjoy it: “Roller Derby saved my soul”.  I would ask you evaluate your league and its objectives very realistically:  if what you are doing satisfies all the participants, then don’t go crazy try to make it a success as a paying sport…..obviously, you must get more dues-paying members and find other ways to fund.

Bob Noxious and I present a seminar annually at Rollercon, and we will address most of the problems you are facing….and not just on a marketing basis.  Bob has written some great features on Derby on the Community page on Brownpapertickets.com, including methods to promote, to gain new recruits, to operate as a business and more.  And obviously I have many years background in promoting Derby and other sports.

Look to the leagues that remain successful…what is the key to what they are doing. Communication is the key here; everyone should not feel she has to reinvent the wheel.

Derby is not going away….with over 1800 leagues in 58 countries, more men’s and junior leagues, it has a real foothold in the more than decade it was developed.  And we at Brown Paper Tickets will help in any way we can.  I am jerry@brownpapertickets.com.