The Second Front


I am just learning how to do this……like most things I do, I refuse to read any instructions so I am just letting wordpress guide me.

By the way, my name is Jerry Seltzer;  I don’t think I mentioned it before and I don’t want to be rude.  I was born in Portland Oregon and remember clearly the day I heard a newsboy yelling “Pearl Harbor attacked”.   Of course no television in 1941, no iphones etc and the radio was not on all the time, so the newspaper was how we found out about things

My life really changed shortly afterwards:  my mother died of breast cancer in March of 1942 (I had never heard the disease mentioned), and my sister and I had to leave Portland to move to Chicago where my father (yes, he invented Roller Derby) spent most of his time.  We only saw him 3 or 4 times a year in Portland.

The country was united against the axis (Japan, Germany and Italy for those who don’t know who our enemies were in WW2) and we were all asked to sacrifice and contribute to the war effort.  Rationing of food and clothing followed shortly and families had to learn to live with limited amounts of meat and other foodstuffs and women became very creative in feeding their families.  Strange new meat products appeared that were made from parts of animals that were previously thrown away as unsuitable for the marketplace (can you say Spam). Most families had an A Sticker to put on their cars which entitled them to 6 gallons of gas per week.

Very few people complained as our soldiers were doing the fighting and we were to help in any way we could.  There were savings bond drives and stars and other personalities would show up and everyone would buy;  of course the main purpose was to take money out of circulation and avoid inflation.  Price controls were established, as well as limits in salaries (90% tax brackets!  And what are you complaining about?).  Since the country had been in such a severe depression it didn’t seem such a hardship and now war jobs were helping families.

I divert, as I often will, and wonder that in all the wars or “police actions” we have been in since then, if the government had asked us to sacrifice we might be in better shape now to really get off of oil dependence and really move to a “clean” economy.  But Johnson and the others decided we could have butter and guns and America could just go on.  (I understand in Iraq in one barrack there is a sign on the wall “We go to war, Americans go to the mall”) And this would have been a killer today:  no cars were produced for civilians from 1942 until 1946.

So now in 1944 I was 12 years old and living in Glenview, a suburb of Chicago.  It sounds terrible but the war was very exciting:  we never heard about our terrible losses in the Pacific or elsewhere until much later, but just how well our boys were doing…there was constant talk of when the real “Second Front” was going to happen.  The Russians, who were now our great friends and allies were pressuring the British and the Americans to attack Europe to take the pressure off of the Eastern Front, but of course we were arguing with each other.  The Brits convinced us to invade Italy in 1943 but we all knew that was not the real invasion.

On June 6th,  just 3 days after my 12th birthday I was at home and suddenly a bulletin came on the radio (I was probably listening to a daily serial:  Superman, etc) that our forces had landed at Normandy in France.   I am certain now that it was hours after it happened as our news was really screened.  My dad was not home, he was at the Coliseum as there was a Roller Derby game that night.   I immediately called the night number of the switchboard (“for emergencies only” he had told me), and they brought him to the phone.”We have invaded Europe at Normandy”…..he was happy for the information and when he came home I asked him how the crowd had responded when the announcer told them what had happened.  “They clapped and cheered”

I was happy…..that was my first successful promotion.

Me


I decided to blog just to see if I am interesting enough to attract any readers.

I am in the older generation category but have managed to stay on the edge of the wave of life because of my entrepreneurial nature.

To start with, my father invented Roller Derby, and without my realizing it, it set the course for my life. I never intended to get involved in it but of course I did. After my childhood and schooling and Stanford and Northwestern (when I run out of things to write about I will of course give some facts about those days as well as my army life), I got married, was selling wholesale sporting goods, and suddenly I was the owner, promoter of the defunct sport of professional Roller Derby.

My father Leo Seltzer, perhaps the greatest promoter you never heard of, decided that Roller Derby had become too much of an exhibition and not the sport he always wanted it to be (he had visions of it in the Olympics – more on that later because it still might), and virtually closed it in 1958.

I had been doing some trackside announcing to pick up extra money for my growing family ($25 per game for 5 games a week doubled my income) when he told me he was shutting it down. In the world of coincidences two moons came in confluence at the same time: KTVU Channel 2 in Oakland California had come on the air and was looking for programming and a young man at Ampex in Redwood City developed video tape which made all programs look live on replay as opposed to the old kinescoping film technique (I won’t explain how and why).

So Bay Bombers Roller Derby appeared on channel 2 and I with a borrowed $500 put up bleachers in an unused auto repair garage on East 14th street in Oakland and created a studio for Roller Derby. I was 26 and didn’t know the odds against success.

In future blogs I will get beyond Roller Derby to the world of ticketing, Rock and Roll, the Hells Angels and me, my touring with Dylan, Bill Graham (the rock and roll one), film, my views on the world and much more. let me hear from you.

You can subscribe free to the blog by entering your email in the subscribe box in the upper right hand corner of the page.  And if I get enough of the blog written and appreciated, I’ll add some other chapeters and  put it together as an e-book.